Review: Eschatology, Liturgy and Christology: Toward Recovering an Eschatological Imagination

Eschatology, Liturgy and Christology: Toward Recovering an Eschatological ImaginationEschatology, Liturgy and Christology: Toward Recovering an Eschatological Imagination by Thomas P. Rausch
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

In his latest book Rausch laments the loss of an appreciation of the eschaton, the bringing about and the inbreaking of the kingdom of God, in favour of the eschata, the sense of hell, judgement, purgatory, etc which is often individualistic and thus disconnected from an understanding of church. The early Christians, as Rausch continually observes, used to pray constantly for the coming of the Lord because they believed that such an eventuality would also herald in the coming of the kingdom that Jesus preached, an eschatological approach that was lost during the dark and medieval ages, in preference to the aforementioned focus on ensuring that the individual was ‘saved’.

Rausch examines the loss of this eschatological vision, and its ramifications for an understanding of Christology and liturgy, in a very thorough and informed way, drawing on the work and reflections of fellow theologians – including a few names that we will all recognise. His work is interesting, timely, and accessible, and I would recommend it to anyone interested in the current state of scholarship in the interplay of Christology, eschatology and liturgy.

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